The Story

When McKenzie-Willamette hospital was purchased in 2003, 14 of the hospital’s social welfare programs were eliminated to cut costs. The employees who had worked within those programs were so passionate about the services that they provided to their community that they refused to see them disappear. They created a brand new nonprofit called Cascade Health Solutions to keep them alive.

The services offered by Cascade Health Solutions ranged from workplace health services to hospice care and, really, the only unifying thread between them was the fact that they’d all been previously offered by the hospital — and would have vanished had it not been for Cascade Health. Though the nonprofit was successful (even listed among the top 20 nonprofits to work for in Oregon), its wide and somewhat disjointed array of services created a branding challenge: What was the best way to describe the organization? Which category did it fall into?

We were asked to help Cascade uncover their story (and better tell it), explain their collection of services, and create a cohesive brand. We spent six months getting to know the organization; learning about their needs, all of their different services, and how they fit together. We then helped develop and solidify the brand’s identity and created a visual identity to better organize and convey Cascade’s services. Ultimately, after more than a year of working together, Cascade unveiled a total brand overhaul: a revised name, new look, new website, new apparel, and new vehicle branding.

Cultivating a Brand Identity

Drawn developed a comprehensive brand personality for Cascade Health. We penned a narrative (fable) about the organization's origin to help new employees empathetically understand their journey. And then, finally, we created a strong visual brand (and brand standards) to match that personality.

Unifying a Collection of Parts

To help organize Cascade Health’s services, we divided them into three divisions: Workplace, In-Home Care, and Hospice Care. Within Cascade Health’s logo, the Workplace Division became orange and its piece of the organization’s logo arched up and to the right, like a nice Wall Street graph. In-Home Care (a deep purple) sloped down to symbolize a decline with age that might necessitate assistance at home (before moving to facilities). And Hospice was shown with a grounding green line, symbolizing the burial of those who have lived a good life.